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2015

Calling for help: damaged nerve cells communicate with stem cells

Nerve cells damaged in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), ‘talk’ to stem cells in the same way that they communicate with other nerve cells, calling out for ‘first aid’, according to new research from the University of Cambridge.

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MRSA contamination found in supermarket sausages and minced pork

MRSA contamination found in supermarket sausages and minced pork

A survey carried out earlier this year has found the first evidence of the ‘superbug’ bacteria Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in sausages and minced pork obtained from supermarkets in the UK. However, researchers stress that this does not pose a significant immediate risk to the public.

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Food poisoning: the bacteria lurking in your chicken

Food poisoning: the bacteria lurking in your chicken

The Cambridge Animal Alphabet series celebrates Cambridge's connections with animals through literature, art, science and society. Here, C is for Chicken – a popular source of protein that carries a hidden hazard in the form of Campylobacter.

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Virus evolution and human behaviour shape global patterns of flu movement

Virus evolution and human behaviour shape global patterns of flu movement

The global movement patterns of all four seasonal influenza viruses are illustrated in research published today in the journal Nature, providing a detailed account of country-to-country virus spread over the last decade and revealing unexpected differences in circulation patterns between viruses.

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Pig-borne disease jumped into humans when rearing practices changed

Pig-borne disease jumped into humans when rearing practices changed

The most virulent strains of Streptococcus suis, the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans in parts of southeast Asia and in pigs around the world, are likely to have evolved and become widespread in pigs at the same time as changes in rearing practices, according to research from an international consortium published today in the journal Nature Communications.

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Minimising ‘false positives’ key to vaccinating against bovine TB

Minimising ‘false positives’ key to vaccinating against bovine TB

New diagnostic tests are needed to make vaccination against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB) viable and the number of false positives from these tests must be below 15 out of every 10,000 cattle tested, according to research published today in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Lassa fever controls need to consider human to human transmission and the role of ‘super spreaders’, say researchers

Lassa fever controls need to consider human to human transmission and the role of ‘super spreaders’, say researchers

One in five cases of Lassa fever – a disease that kills around 5,000 people a year in West Africa – could be due to human-to-human transmission, with a large proportion of these cases caused by ‘super-spreaders’, according to research published today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Lassa fever controls need to consider human to human transmission and the role of ‘super spreaders’, say researchers - Read More…